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What’s New

The herbaceous border is now an exuberance of color and while most of the plants are admired solely for their appearance there are some that are beautiful and useful as well, an attribute that is much sought after by young men of a certain age who aspire to find these same qualities in a prospective mate. … Continue Reading »

It’s the 18th century in America, and soldiers are making life-altering sacrifices. Friendships are lost. Families are divided. Health and safety are risked, and lost are the basic comforts most citizens take for granted. All these challenges pale in comparison to the task of coming home and finding their places in a changed world.

Nathaniel … Continue Reading »

Now that you’ve had a crash course in 18th-century signs, why not test yourself with our quiz?

Milliner ShopShoemaker ShopTailor ShopCarpentry ShopCabinetry ShopCooper ShopWheelwrightStableCarriage HouseGreat Hopes PlantationFoodwaysDubois Grocer

By Karen Gonzalez

Wander down the Duke of Gloucester Street in Williamsburg and you’ll see a variety of attractive and iconic shop signs. Replicated from English-style signs found in 18th-century London, they were an important part of advertising a business location.

CHALLENGE YOURSELF

Take our sign quiz.

Sometimes the nature of the business was clear. But not always.

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The 2016 presidential campaign is underway with a large slate of candidates, at least on the Republican side.

What are the qualities we look for in a leader?

Which is more significant, policy positions or personal character? Experience or vision?

In this imagined conversation at Christiana Campbell’s Tavern, Baptist preacher Gowan Pamphlet and esteemed jurist … Continue Reading »

By John Watson

Music paper was used during original construction to shim the bearers. That kept the toe boards (the next layer, not shown) above the sliders allowing the sliders to move freely.

Perhaps it seemed only natural that the original makers of the organ wind-chest chose old printed music to use as paper shims. The … Continue Reading »